2016 Conference Schedule

All events are located at Metropolitan Community College’s Historic Fort Omaha Campus, 32nd & Sorensen Parkway, unless otherwise stated.

Saturday, May 28|Sunday, May 29 |Monday, May 30|Tuesday, May 31|
Wednesday, June 1|Thursday, June 2|Friday, June 3|Saturday, June 4

Every Day

9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Conference Registration and Information Center

SCC 1st Floor Lobby

SATURDAY, MAY 28

9:00 a.m.

Design Wing

Mule Barn Atrium

10:00 – 11:00 a.m

Conference Orientation  

SCC 1st Floor Bistro

11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Theatre Workshop – Session One

 
 

The Unbearable Lightness of the Playwright/Director Relationship with Michael French
How is equal space given to a relationship that’s built to collide because of its inherent differing agendas? The director wants artistic freedom; the playwright wants the sanctity of script. The director wants leeway to interpret; the playwright wants authorial intention maintained. This workshop looks at how to navigate the complexities of bringing a script to the stage from the director’s point of view, but with a playwright in mind. No attorneys needed!

Mule Barn 101

 

Artistic Authenticity and Writing What You Do Not Know with Elena Araoz and Quinn Corbin
Investigating controversial questions such as “Do you have to write what you know?” “Who are you allowed to write for?” and in a world of blind submissions, “Does it matter who wrote the play?” We’ll wrestle with matters of authenticity both in the art and the industry. Through writing exercises, we’ll articulate why we feel compelled to tell particular stories and explore ways to insert ourselves more fully into our work while maintaining the balance between overly personalized and too general. We’ll work to find our way into a new narrative through our own personal and unique lenses. Led by Quinn Corbin (a former theatrical agent and current script reader for multiple theatres and festivals) and Elena Araoz (a director and writer), this workshop will delve into the politicized debate of writing characters or stories different than who we are.

Mule Barn 102

 

Using Setting to Explode the Stuck Scene with Josh Hecht
What do you do when you have a scene that's just kinda...meh. It's functional, but it's flat. Something's stuck. Maybe it's just a little boring? How do you make the scene come alive? This workshop will use a series of exercises to help you use the scene's setting to unlock it's hidden life. Bring with you a scene you want to explode and something to write with and let's play.

Mule Barn 105

 

Playwright’s Gym with Margaret Baldwin
This workshop will jumpstart your process and help you reconnect with the PLAY in playwriting. Through brief exercises designed to help us—as playwrights—get out of our own way, we will explore the basic tools of drama (plot, character, words, music, and spectacle) and dive into some serious play. We will start with a gentle warm-up of our bodies and voices and will approach through the various languages of the stage. The workshop will offer a balance of group and individual exercises and will include simple stagings of generated work. Good for writers at any level of experience looking to recharge and reconnect with their own creative impulses. Come armed with a notebook or journal and your favorite non-electronic writing instrument. Dress in clothes that allow you to move.

Mule Barn 106

 

The Jazz Acting Technique with Levy Lee Simon
Experience Ernie McClintock’s Jazz Acting Technique, which concentrates on the actor approaching his or her work with the same freeness, openness, and improvisational mindset as a great jazz artist. It explores the body as an instrument and the emotions as notes - all while working in unity with an ensemble of like-minded actors (players).

Mule Barn 112

12:30 p.m. - 1:45 pm

Lunch

SCC 201 B

1:15 – 2:00 pm

Orientation for PlayLab and MainStage Responders

SCC 201 D

2:00 – 3:30 p.m

Theatre Workshop – Session Two

 
 

Playmaking from found text with Constance Congdon
Connie will bring in various examples of text and you will work in groups to make a scene out of the samples. Then we will read them in class and do as many as possible. Bring? Yourselves.

Mule Barn 101

 

Writing in Tongues with Emma Goldman-Sherman
Writers can be limited by what we allow ourselves to write. Permission needs granting. So how do we write what we do not know? How do we allow ourselves to discover strangers in our own work? This workshop addresses how white playwrights might inhabit characters of color in the worlds of their plays, and how all playwrights can enlarge the dictum "write what you know" to include "write what you want to know" and beyond… Playwrights of all kinds are welcome to join me in a workshop that will provide you with the tools you need -- like compassion, a grounding in what it means to have white privilege and how to find yours, curiosity to foster honest dialogue, and exercises to help your brain chart new territory, to give yourself permissions to try new approaches, and to inhabit new voices in your work!

Mule Barn 102

 

The Left Handed Compliment with Eliza Bent
Make use of your non-dominant hand -- or non-dominant language -- and discover the side door to your writing. By imposing physical and linguistic constraints we will essentialize ideas and dialogue and get to the heart of the matter. Unpretentious poems and organic movement might also happen.

Mule Barn 105

 

Audition Fundamentals with Mia Morris
This workshop is for actors who are interested in working on elements of the audition; one of the most challenging aspects to the craft of acting. Concentration, focus, connecting with a scene partner, and overall audition preparedness will be explored through exercises and text. Please dress comfortably, we will be moving.

Mule Barn 106
 

The Energized Self with Mary Beth Easley
Everything is energy and that’s all there is to it. Match the Frequency of the reality you want and you cannot help but get that reality. It can be no other way. This is not philosophy. This is Physics.
- Albert Einstein
Theater is a living art form: it takes place in time (impacted by sound), moving (kinetically) through space (the visual field). This living art form generates energy, and that energy impacts both the generator and the receiver. The purpose of this workshop is to introduce the principles of individual and collective energy flow and investigate how these principles can be applied toward the creation of dramatic art.

Mule Barn 112

SUNDAY, MAY 29

Top

9:00 a.m.

Design Wing

Mule Barn Atrium

11:00 a.m.– 12:30 p.m.

Theatre Workshop – Session Three  
 

Getting Unstuck with Kia Corthron
Do you feel stuck on the play you’re currently working on? Or did you get stuck on a former piece and finally, in frustration, put it aside? This workshop will help get you out of creative gridlock, allowing you to open up your play via new, unexplored territory.

Mule Barn 101

 

Strengthening Your Artistic Statements with Elena Araoz and Quinn Corbin
Artistic Statements for theatre development opportunities, for any kind of theatre artist, can feel like a pitch and, in part, feel like a lie. We’ll explore ways to approach this often daunting task from a more playful and personal perspective. Through writing exercises, we’ll investigate what makes each of our artistries unique and each of our projects worth developing. We’ll discuss the industry standards for a great Artistic Statement and then we’ll discover how to break that mold to show off our authentic and unique voice. Led by Quinn Corbin (a former theatrical agent and current script reader for multiple theatres and festivals) and Elena Araoz (a director and writer), this workshop will delve into practical methods to approach each Artistic Statement with fresh eyes and ask for what we need from a development opportunity.

Mule Barn 102
 

The Second Act: The Trouble with Resolving it All with Heather Helinsky
In this workshop, we will tackle the challenging and common problems that arise when writing Act Two, especially in this day when we're all writing that 90-minute, intermission-less play for producers. We’ll look at some scene work examples and work through some short writing exercises together. If you’d like to share what you’re working on now, please contact HH before attending. Helinsky, a dramaturg who evaluates scripts for several national new play festivals (GPTC, O'Neill, Sundance, PlayPenn), will explore some various approaches a dramaturg uses in a development process when a writer is unsure of how to “fix their Act Two problem.”

Mule Barn 105

.

Taking Charge of Your Rewrite with Josh Hecht
As writers, you will receive approximately 7,000 notes on your play between first draft and opening night. So, how do you take charge of your own rewrite? Before you start rewriting based on notes you get from someone else, how do you assess your own draft, identify strengths and weaknesses and set your own goals? This workshop is designed to help you do just that: diagnose your own draft yourself and start the rewrite you want to do before you start listening to the thoughts of others. A variety of exercises will help you to think structurally about how your play works while also continuing to tap into the unconscious impulses that are its lifeblood

Mule Barn 106

 

Unsettling Incident with Jody McAuliffe
Think of an unsettling incident that happened to you. It can be funny, weird, scary, sad, or a combination – but whatever it is, it should be something that stayed in your mind, nagging at you: something you did at a party, an odd encounter on a bus, a mysterious phone-call, an accident you saw on the street, anything – as long as it affected you. Write a scene leading up to a MONOLOGUE, in which a character who has had an experience similar to yours TELLS this story to someone. Use what happened to you as the ‘plot’ for this story, but find a substitute for yourself, as the character who will speak the monologue.

Mule Barn 112

12:30 pm

Lunch SCC 201 B

1:00 – 1:45 pm

Luncheon Panel Series

The Wider World: Representation and diversity in writing/casting
Emma Goldman-Sherman, Martine Keir Green-Rogers, Heather Helinsky, Megan Monaghan Rivas

SCC 201 B

2:00 – 4:30 p.m

Concurrent PlayLab Readings

 
 

The Violet Sisters by Gina Femia
In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, Pam comes home to Red Hook, Brooklyn to attend her father’s funeral. She has not been nor seen her sister in eight years. When she arrives, she is greeted by an angry sister, a dilapidated house and a past that she can’t escape. Despite all of her best intentions, the conversation quickly turns tense and the two sisters are forced to deal with all that they have let slip away, all the words that have been left unsaid for years. A two-person, one set, real time play, The Violet Sisters is a play about forgiving when you cannot bring yourself to forget.

Director: Stephanie Jacobsen
Actors:
Sam - Lauren Krupski
Pam - Miriam Gutierrez

Stage Directions - Katy Kepler
Responders: Quinn Corbin, Josh Wilder
Dramaturg: Emma Goldman - Sherman

SCC 201 A

 

Don’t Be Evil by Bennett Fisher
In this dark comedy about interrogation and innovation, a computer programmer is arrested after the search engine he designs answers “yes” to the question “is the government of the United States evil?” Desperate, he strikes a deal with his captors, agreeing to resign the software in exchange for his freedom. As they work to understand the search engine’s answer andhow to change it, both the programmer and his persecutors begin to question their faith, their ability, and whether it is possible to do something good in the service of something evil.

Director: Jack Zerbe
Actors:
Hayes – Moira Mangiameli
Kavanaugh – Randy Breedlove
Webster – Michael Juarez
Murdoch – Hughston Walkinshaw

Responders: Levy Lee Simon, Ron Zank
Dramaturg: Megan Monaghan Rivas

SCC 201 D

 

Frelmetsch the Maneater by Matthew Capodicasa
On the set of a sci-fi/adventure film, Mel and Jason, two puppeteers, meet for the first time inside of a giant, two-person puppet. They have only five days to sync themselves up in order to create a monstrous villain known as Frelmetsch, and get all of the shots they need before a dismissive producer shuts down the operation in favor of CGI. But as Mel and Jason begin to merge themselves, they also begin to earn a certain respect for their creation, for one another, and the record of this collaboration that will be forever recorded on film.

Director: Scott Working
Actors:
Mel – Stephanie Anderson
Jason – Isaac Reilly

Stage Directions –
Responders: Eliza Bent, Margaret Baldwin
Dramaturg: Heather Helinsky

SCC 201 F

6:30 p.m. Gallery Walk

7:30 p.m. Performance

PlayFest

Northside Carnation by Denise Chapman
A play based on the life of Mildred D. Brown, matriarch of Omaha’s north side and founder of the Omaha Star newspaper, a channel of communication for Omaha’s African American community. The play journeys across four decades of Omaha history and explores the struggles and triumphs of a leader and a community in a time of great change, asking the question, "Where do we need to go from here?" The play will be performed alongside a gallery installation of the same theme.

Director: Lara Marsh

The Carver Bank Building
2416 Lake St. (Gallery)

Elks Hall Iroquois Lodge No. 92
2420 Lake St. (Performance)

MONDAY, MAY 30

Top

9:00 a.m.

Design Wing

Mule Barn Atrium

10:00 – 12:30 p.m.

Concurrent PlayLab Readings  
 

Tiny by Sarah Mantell
Rachel and Greg have just built a tiny house and now they need somewhere to park it. When friends offer their yard, the couples become intertwined in ways they never expected. A play about the tiny house movement, surrogacy, folk songs, the Northwest Passage, and the stories we tell and the stories we don’t.

Director: M. Michele Phillips
Actors:
Ray – Anna Jordan
Greg - Eric Grant Leanna
Neil - Dan Luethke
Hannah - Regina Palmer

Stage Directions – Stephanie Anderson
Responders: Levy Lee Simon, Ron Zank
Dramaturg: Heather Helinsky

SCC 201A

 

Snowed In: An Imagining by Paul Hufker
Edward Snowden is trapped in a small Russian airport. To stave off insanity, he invents a personality for a Russian stapler, and he talks to his cat. But more than this, Snowden seems to be very interested in the Holographic Principle. For the first time since this leak-turned escape ordeal began, the Principle has Snowden’s synapses firing in a pleasing manner. Spacetime becomes appropriately fluid as characters weave their way into and out of Snowden’s airport world. But beyond all this, a black cloud (or a black hole?) is beginning to swallow up the outside world. How does Snowden get out of this one?

Director: Samuel Brett Williams
Actors:
Snowden – J. Richard Thomas
Cat – Claudia de Latour
Female Roles – Wendy Hamilton
Stapler – Brent Lubbert
Male Roles – Daniel Palensky

Responders: Margaret Baldwin, Matt Gutschick
Dramaturg: Emma Goldman – Sherman

SCC 201D

 

The Least Worst Place by Lindsay Joelle
A new recruit learns he's destined to become his nation's greatest hero. A mixed--‐ race translator pledges loyalty to her country, but may be leaking classified information over enemy lines. When they meet on a military transport plane, the two soldiers begin a secret love that will pit who they say they are against who the war demands they be. Between late night training simulations, early missions, and a resurrecting bird that may or may not be an omen of doom, Briseis and Achilles' pillow talk reveals two ordinary people falling in love. But how well can you ever know the person sleeping beside you?

Director: Bonnie Gill
Actors: Achilles – Michael Judah
              Briseis – Jodi Vacarro
              Odysseus – Will Wright
              Chryses – Tim Barr
              Narrator – Emily Neve  

Responders: Elena Araoz, Michael French
Dramaturg: Megan Monaghan Rivas

SCC 201F

12:30 p.m.

Lunch

SCC 201 B

1:00 – 1:45 pm

Luncheon Panel Series
Design/Community/Environment: How does (or can) the community and environment where the performance takes place interact with the design?

Reza Behjat, Isabelle Parzygnat, Karim Rivera Rosado, Elizabeth Smith, Cheyenne Sykes
Moderated by Justin Townsend

SCC 201 B

2:00 – 3:30 p.m.

Concurrent PlayLab Readings  
 

Upstairs by Erin Lane
Sometimes hard work gets you nowhere…
The hopes and dreams of laundry workers crash into each other, then they realize their hopes and dreams aren't necessarily what they want. And there's a talking mouse.

Director: Molly Welsh
Actors:
Mauve – Echelle Childers
Coral – Shanti Psota
Mouse – Ashley Wright
Cobalt – Bill Grennan
Bartholomew - Hughston Walkinshaw

Responders: Quinn Corbin, Mia Morris
Dramaturg: Martine Kei Green - Rogers

SCC 201A

 

Tom & Eliza by Celine Song
Tom’s mother and father made love, Tom was born, Tom grew up, Tom entered this restaurant, Tom is on a date with Eliza. Eliza’s mother and father made love, Eliza was born, Eliza grew up, Eliza entered this restaurant, Eliza is on a date with Tom. A play about two people marching relentlessly towards the future.

Director: Eliza Bent
Actors:
Tom – John Gasper
Eliza – Eliza Bent

Responders: Josh Hecht, Josh Wilder
Dramaturg: Emma Goldman – Sherman

SCC 201D

 

Killing Crazy by Brian Bornstein
Louis Righetti is a prisoner on death row whose competency to be executed is in question due to possible mental illness. As his execution date nears, he receives visits from the psychologist who is conducting his competency evaluation and from the prison chaplain, who offers him spiritual counseling. The play explores the legal, personal, and professional issues involved in executing someone who may not be of sound mind. Is it ethical to kill a crazy person, or is anyone who would kill at least a little bit crazy?

Director: Anthony Clark - Kaczmarek
Actors:
Dr. Jill Otto - Kim Clark-Kaczmarek,
Louis Righetti - Nils Haaland
Rev. Hal Johnson - Brennan Thomas
Warden - Christopher Scott

Stage Directions - Tom Neumann
Responders: Mary Beth Easley, Michael French
Dramaturg: Megan Monaghan Rivas

SCC 201F

4:00 – 5:30 p.m.

Concurrent PlayLab Readings  
 

Royal Jelly by Paul Cameron Hardy
Hernandez, McCoy, and Boz Rawlson, beat cops all three, enjoy a disgusting, rowdy picnic in a field. When Della, a young do-gooder encroaches on their party to plant wildflowers in an effort to help save the world's bee population, the police – ever reactionary – threaten to arrest and tase her. After confiscating and eating her seed bombs (Mistaken for candies), the cops all turn into wildflowers. Della panics, trying to find a way to undo this, while the flowers get pollinate by bees, and witness other (some odd, some mundane) happenings in the field they are now rooted to.

Director: Josh Mullady
Actors:
Della - Caitlin Mabon
Jane- Olivia Jones
Trish- M. Michel Phillips
Hernandez - Mallory Freilich
McCoy -
Boz Rawlson -
Fletcher - Tim Mantil
Joey - Kelsi Weston
Eddi -
Jordy - Colleen Kilcoyne
Fred Upstairs - Robby Stone
Carla - Deana Schweiger

Responders: Josh Hecht, Josh Wilder
Dramaturg: Heather Helinsky

SCC 201A

 

Mamacita and the Negrito by Emilio Rodriquez
A fast paced spoken word romance told through poetry and vignettes dealing with a San Francisco couple who fall in love and have a baby in the mid 90’s and their present day child dealing with being unwanted and searching for a love of his own. Desire and destiny collide in this often comedic, often heartbreaking journey of self-discovery and the importance of living “como si mañana fuera ahora (like if tomorrow were right now)”.

Director: Beth Thompson
Actors:
Lorena/Brooklyn – Caitlin Staebell
Ricky/Daniel – Joseph Schoborg

Stage Directions – Katie Cameron
Responders: Eliza Bent, Quinn Corbin
Dramaturg: Emma Goldman - Sherman

SCC 201D

 

Meet Murasaki Shikibu Followed by Book-Signing, and Other Things by Julia Izumi
Tonight we welcome Murasaki Shikibu in conversation to kick off the book launch of The Tale of Genji, one of the first novels ever written. Like, in the whole world. Granted, the event is over 1000 years late, but to make up for lost time, Lady Murasaki has a lot to say. If you’re lucky, she might even talk about the book. She will take questions and give autographs following the discussion. Priority seating with book purchase. Moderator TBD.

Director: Mia Morris
Actors:
Murasaki Shikubu – Celine Song
Bookstore Manager – Mary Kelly

Stage Directions -
Responders: Mary Beth Easley, Michael French
Dramaturg: Martine Kei Green-Rogers

SCC 201F

7:30 p.m.

GPTC Fringe
Coordinated by Andrea Hart

40th Street Theatre
40th & Hamilton
4006 1/2 Hamilton St

TUESDAY, MAY 31

Top

9:00 a.m

Design Wing

Mule Barn Atrium

10:00 – 12:30 p.m.

Concurrent PlayLab Readings  
 

King Dick by Christian Levatino
The Manson case is in full swing and Mercury is in retrograde. Christmastime, 1970: The King just spent 100 G’s on gifts, and he’s on the run from Graceland. His kata form cannot be topped. He pops pills like peanut butter bacon banana sandwiches and dreams of Butterfly Flying on Shaoshi Mountain. After a face to face with an American Airlines bathroom oracle, Elvis concocts a scheme to offer the leader of the free world his influential voice in exchange for a new symbol of power. King Dick examines the true events that led Elvis Presley to seek out President Richard Nixon for a Federal AgentatLarge badge. Will Dick Nixon say yes? The future of America depends on The King. This was the last time anyone would be allowed to cold call the President of the United States.

Director: Lorie Obradovich
Actors:
Elvis Presley – Rob Baker
Richard Nixon/Gladys Presley – Jeff Shields
Jesse Presley – Ben Sieff
Bud Krogh – David Sindelar
Dwight Chapin – Wes Clowers
Jerry Schilling – Any Niess
Sonny West – Simon Lovell
Rosemary – Karen Cordes

Stage Directions – Erika Hall Sieff
Responders: Matt Gutschick, Ron Zank
Dramaturg: Megan Monaghan Rivas

SCC 201A

 

Countdown to the Happy Day by Thomas W. Stephens
A two-character drama that depicts, in gritty street language and with grim humor, the unlikely involvement of Gertie, thirties/forties and a self-inflicted street person, and Cervin, a hulking fifteen-year old, both of whom are African American. From their initial explosive encounter on a nighttime city street, the two are chary of each other and emotionally combustible. Gertie, a troubled Army vet, resists being drawn into the world of Cervin, a seventh-grade dropout dependent on a bed-bound mother. Their relationship, nonetheless, grows ever more overlaid, complex, and inevitable as Cervin’s needs overwhelm Gertie’s deliberate detachment, forcing her to confront the pain and grief weighing at her core. In the play’s final moments they together chant a “countdown” to a happy day they both so crave and for which they continue waiting.

Director: TammyRa’ Jackson
Actors:
Gertie – TammyRa’ Jackson
Cervin – Jayven Brandt

Stage Directions – Nadia Williams
Responders: Elena Araoz, Levy Lee Simon
Dramaturg: Martine Kei Green-Rogers

SCC 201D

 

We Will Not Describe the Conversation by Eugenie Carabatsos
In Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment, he delineates a key moment of the novel—when the protagonist’s sister, Dunya, and his lover, Sonya, discuss Raskolnikov’s crime, murdering an elderly pawnbroker with an axe—in this way, “We will not describe the conversation and the tears of the two girls, and how friendly they became.” This sentence is the inspiration for this play. We Will Not Describe the Conversation is set in the Midwest in the early 1990s. Dani, a massage therapist, is visited in the middle of the night by Sonya, who claims that Dani’s brother, Ross, has committed a heinous crime.
Director: Danielle Smith
Actors:
Ross – Brendan JD Reilly
Sonya – Madeline Radcliff Reilly
Dani – Amy Schweid

Stage Directions – Dani Smith
Responders: D. Scott Glasser, Samuel Brett Williams
Dramaturg: Heather Helinsky

SCC 201F

12:30 p.m.

Lunch

SCC 201 B

1:00 – 1:45 pm

Luncheon Panel Series
The Worst and Best: Tall tales of production experiences and why and what you learned
Constance Congdon, Kia Corthron, Jody McAuliffe
Moderated by Eliza Bent

SCC 201 B

2:00 – 5:00 p.m. 

Concurrent PlayLab Readings  
 

D-Pad by Jeremy Gable
Video game development is the only thing Alex Newbauer really knows. She spends all day in her apartment, toiling away on an independently financed game entitled D-Pad that is loosely based on her sister Rachel’s humanitarian work in Brazil. As she engages in discussions with the video game character she has created, she tries to work out the game’s glitches in time for its release date. Alex soon realizes that she needs to re-do the entire game, focusing on the sociopolitical aspects of Rachel’s work. However, a threatening phone call reveals that this news is not received well by the gaming community. Alex is met with a barrage of hateful e-mails, calls and Tweets from a group of gamers who are upset about the new change. And D-Pad quickly becomes a battle not just to make something important, but to make anything at all.

Director: Roxanne Wach
Actors:
Alex Newbauer – Ariel Bauer
Rachel Newbauer – Colleen O’Doherty
Justin Bailey – Eric Grant Leanna
Fan, etc. – Beau Fisher

Stage Directions – Dan Wach
Responders: Matt Gutschick, Josh Hecht
Dramaturg: Heather Helinsky

SCC 201A

 

Giantess by Genne Murphy
Dee is caring for her ailing grandmother, Rita, when she hears a mysterious noise in the abandoned glass factory behind her house. She discovers a lost girl her own age with amnesia – who happens to be 30 feet tall. Dee and the giantess try to figure out who she is, where she came from and their deepening connection to one another. Giantess is a play about complicated bodies, identities, choices, and fate.

Director: Jody McAuliffe
Actors:
Dee –
Lost Girl/Giantess/Valentine – Valerie Cuevas
Rita – Pat Kies
Zack – Jon Roberson

Stage Directions - Diana Molino
Responders: Margaret Baldwin, Samuel Brett Williams
Dramaturg: Martine Kei Green-Rogers

SCC 201D

 

Breeders by Dan Giles
Dean and Mikey are two men who are about to have a baby. Until recently, they both thought that they were ready to settle down. Now, stifled by convention and dreaming of adventure, Dean has doubts that gnaw at him, but he can’t change his mind unless he’s prepared to break Mikey’s heart. Jason and Tyson are two hamsters who are about to have nine babies. Until recently, they both thought that they were male. Now, smothered by affection and longing for escape, Tyson has fears that nibble at her, but she can’t break free unless she’s prepared to silence Jason forever. All this is to say that nobody was planning to eat anyone. Things just got out of hand. Breeders is a comedy about the cozy cage of mainstreamed queerness, the surprising variety of things that can fit in one’s mouth, and the tender savagery of ordinary love.

Director: Ron Zank
Actors:
Dean –
Mikey – Bill Grennan
Jason – Nick Albrecht
Tyson – Krystal Kelly Warren

Stage Directions – Thomas Lowe
Responders: Mia Morris, Mary Beth Easley
Dramaturg: Emma Goldman - Sherman

SCC 201F

7:30 p.m.

PlayFest

Leftovers by Josh Wilder
In inner city Philadelphia, an abnormally huge dandelion has grown through the sidewalk in front of the house of Jalil and Kwamaine, two brothers who are waiting for the arrival of their nonexistent father. Leftovers tell the story of the brothers as they figure out their journey to manhood without their father and discover the reality of their dreams. A poignant, poetic, gritty play full of family and magic, the play was featured as a GPTC MainStage reading in 2014.

Director: Levy Lee Simon

Metropolitan Community College
Fort Omaha Campus
Swanson Conference Center
32nd and Sorensen Parkway

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1

Top

9:00 a.m.

Design Wing

Mule Barn Atrium

11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Theatre Workshop – Session Four

 
 

Playmaking from found text with Constance Congdon
Connie will bring in various examples of text and you will work in groups to make a scene out of the samples. Then we will read them in class and do as many as possible. Bring? Yourselves.

Mule Barn 101

 

Getting Unstuck with Kia Corthron
Do you feel stuck on the play you’re currently working on? Or did you get stuck on a former piece and finally, in frustration, put it aside? This workshop will help get you out of creative gridlock, allowing you to open up your play via new, unexplored territory.

Mule Barn 102

 

Unsettling Incident with Jody McAuliffe
Think of an unsettling incident that happened to you. It can be funny, weird, scary, sad, or a combination – but whatever it is, it should be something that stayed in your mind, nagging at you: something you did at a party, an odd encounter on a bus, a mysterious phone-call, an accident you saw on the street, anything – as long as it affected you. Write a scene leading up to a MONOLOGUE, in which a character who has had an experience similar to yours TELLS this story to someone. Use what happened to you as the ‘plot’ for this story, but find a substitute for yourself, as the character who will speak the monologue.

Mule Barn 105

 

Playwright’s Gym with Margaret Baldwin
This workshop will jumpstart your process and help you reconnect with the PLAY in playwriting. Through brief exercises designed to help us—as playwrights—get out of our own way, we will explore the basic tools of drama (plot, character, words, music, and spectacle) and dive into some serious play. We will start with a gentle warm-up of our bodies and voices and will approach through the various languages of the stage. The workshop will offer a balance of group and individual exercises and will include simple stagings of generated work. Good for writers at any level of experience looking to recharge and reconnect with their own creative impulses. Come armed with a notebook or journal and your favorite non-electronic writing instrument. Dress in clothes that allow you to move.

Mule Barn 106

 

Move with David Neumann
This workshop will be about noticing and changing the patterns of a body that spends most of its time in a seated position. A movement class to find more breath, ease tension and stretch a little bit. Shake off the hangover. Stand a little taller. Move more freely. No dance/movement experience necessary. Wear loose, comfortable clothing.

SCC ICA 201A

12:30 p.m.

Lunch

SCC 201 B

1:00 – 1:45 pm  

Luncheon Panel Series
Agents: The good, the bad, and the ugly

Quinn Corbin
Moderated by Ron Zank

SCC 201 B

2:00 – 4:30 p.m. 

Concurrent PlayLab Readings  
 

Great White by Deborah Yarchun
Fourteen-year-old Brooke is in trouble. Her sixteen-year-old sister, Ivy, is manic and increasingly violent, and their mother, Gail, refuses to acknowledge the danger. As Brooke struggles to hold her family together, she copes by tracking a great white shark. This leads her to Luis, a troubled fifteen-year-old boy intent on swimming out to meet the shark in the ocean. As their friendship deepens, Brooke becomes increasingly aware of the shark drawing closer in her own life: that her sister, in a manic fit, might kill her. Set in present-day southern Florida, between coastal floods, Great White is a coming-of-age story that explores unremitting love for family, and the consequences of inaction.

Director: Jeremy Stoll
Actors:
Ivy – Anna Jordan
Gail – Jennifer Long
Luis – Nicholas Young

Stage Directions – Abby Cameron
Responders: Josh Wilder, Ron Zank
Dramaturg: Martine Kei Green-Rogers

SCC 201A

 

The Ice Treatment by Nate Eppler
Left behind on the garbage heap of history and misremembered by everyone (herself included), the world’s most infamous Olympic figure skater struggles to reinvent herself as a screenwriter by pitching the blockbuster screenplay of her own amazing life story and her spectacular triumph over stunning adversity. Armed with an old VHS video camera, two actors she hired off craigslist, plastic fashion dolls, and homemade model ice rinks, she remakes her past by transforming it into the best sports movie you’ve never seen. She’s reclaiming her life story and she isn't going to let facts get in the way of what she knows to be true: She’s the hero.

Director: Eliza Bent
Actors:

Responders: D. Scott Glasser, Samuel Brett Williams
Dramaturg: Megan Monaghan Rivas

SCC 201D

 

5 More by Bonnie Metzgar
Ruth is 100 years old and can still crack the neck of a bobcat in her bare hands. DJ is 50. They just celebrated their 25th anniversary with Fiona and they’re thinking it’s time for a change. They know all about change. They’re a 5, and 5s are change junkies, especially queer ones. DJ used to be Dory and before that, Dorothy Jane. One day, a long time ago when Dorothy Jane’s grandpa died, she had to go live with her great aunt Rahu, who told her she was a 5 while stirring a pot of rib bones on the stove. Now after a fight kept them apart for 25 years, Rahu wants to see her.

Director: Sonia Keffer
Actors:
DJ – Andrea Hart
Dory – Colleen O’Doherty
Dorothy Jane – Joselyn Hayko
Ruth/Rahu – Char Willoughby
Fiona – Ashley Spessard
Pop – Paul Boesing
Nurse – Nik Whitcomb

Responders: Margaret Baldwin, Mia Morris
Dramaturg: Heather Helinsky

SCC 201F

7:30 p.m. 

PlayFest
I Understand Everything Better - Advanced Beginner Group
Combining extraordinary theatrical invention and virtuosic text this multidisciplinary dance-based performance by Bessie-Award winning choreographer/performer David Neumann, explores our impulse to report on calamity; the shimmer of attention to realms unseen; the concurrence of unrelated events and the body as evidence of a will having to let go. Neumann’s “deeply felt and deeply moving” work (NY Times) manifests as a ‘solo with other performers’, marking Neumann’s return to performing in his own work after an absence of several years.

Direction and Choreography by David Neumann
Text by Sibyl Kempson

Creighton University Lied Education Center for the Arts
2500 California St.

THURSDAY, JUNE 2

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10:00 – 12:30 p.m.

MainStage Reading  
 

Night at the Big Chief Motel by Caroline Prugh
It's May, 27, 1994. Abigail & Jet are driving cross-country to meet Richard (boyfriend of former, best friend of latter) in L.A. A new twist on a classic American genre, Night at the Big Chief Motel is a road trip fairytale from the era before smart phones and Google maps.

Director: Moira Mangiameli
Actors:
Abigail – Britta Tollefsrud
Jet – Anna Jordan
Jolene – Haley Piper-Haas
Richard/Mike – Dan Luethke

Stage Directions – Pegeen Reilly
Responders: Constance Congdon, Kia Corthron, Jody McAuliffe
Dramaturg: Megan Monaghan Rivas

SCC 201A

12:30 p.m.

Lunch

SCC 201 B

1:00 – 1:45 p.m.

Luncheon Panel Series
Barton Fink: Observations of a playwright writing for TV and film

Samuel Brett Williams and Kia Corthron
Moderated by Samuel Brett Williams

SCC 201 B

2:00 – 4:30 p.m.

MainStage Reading  
 

Catch the Wall by Gabrielle Reisman
After New Orleans bouncer MC dies, middle-schoolers Cleo and Justice plot a music video so their mentor’s memory can live on. As the MC’s ghost tangles with the girls’ Teach for America teachers, students and educators push back against a button-down charter school climate, and work to get their own stories heard.

Director: Michael French
Actors:
Cleo – Nadia Williams
Justice – Jalaya Haynes
K’Wann – Jayven Brandt
Kevin –
Benefit – Francesca Hogan
Melonie/Ms. Dyer – Katie Otten
Ms. Terry/Ms. Darby – Camille Metoyer-Moten
Ariyel – Regina Palmer

Stage Directions – Abby Cameron
Responders: Constance Congdon, Kia Corthron, Jody McAuliffe
Dramaturg: Martine Kei Green-Rogers

SCC 201A

6:00 pm

OPTIONAL ACTIVITY
Book Signing with Kia Corthron - for her new book The Castle Cross the Magnet Carter: A Novel.

**Sign up for this optional activity at the Registration Desk. Transportation will be provided for Conference guests**

The Bookworm Bookstore
2501 S. 90th St.

FRIDAY, JUNE 3

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9:00 a.m.

Design Wing

Mule Barn Atrium

10:00 – 12:30 p.m..

MainStage Reading

 

 

Portugal by Elizabeth Heffron
When an ‘off-normal event’ occurs at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in rural Eastern Washington – home to the US’ largest stockpile of unprocessed, highly radioactive nuclear waste and the most contaminated place in the Western Hemisphere – the lives of 5 local people are changed forever.

Director: Mary Beth Easley
Actors: Linnea Jones – TBD
Chip Jones – Brian Zealand
Tina Jones – Mia Morris
Santiago Ruiz – Homero Vela
Mark McKay – Ben Beck

Stage Directions – Katie Cameron
Responders: Constance Congdon, Kia Corthron, Jody McAuliffe
Dramaturg: Emma Goldman - Sherman

SCC 201A

12:30 p.m.

Lunch

SCC 201 B

1:00 – 1:45 pm

Luncheon Panel Series
Resource Sharing: Open mic for playwrights to share their best resources with each other.

SCC 201 B

2:00 – 3:30 p.m

Theatre Workshop – Session Five

 
 

The Art of Self Production with Eliza Bent
Don't know where to start when it comes to producing your own work? Let's get to work. In this workshop with Bent discover how producing can be as artful and satisfying as writing plays. The craft of the polite-yet-persistent follow up will be explored along with how to write a stellar press release and how to engage in brain tempests, a brain storm that is so big that it inspires you to reach a bigger goal than you could have imagined.

Mule Barn 101

 

The Unbearable Lightness of the Playwright, Director Relationship with Michael French
How is equal space given to a relationship that’s built to collide because of its inherent differing agendas? The director wants artistic freedom; the playwright wants the sanctity of script. The director wants leeway to interpret; the playwright wants authorial intention maintained. This workshop looks at how to navigate the complexities of bringing a script to the stage from the director’s point of view, but with a playwright in mind. No attorneys needed!

Mule Barn 102

 

Language and Action in Conversation with David Neumann
This workshop will use formal approaches to generating physical events and actions as a compositional tool and then place the discoveries made in relation to found and original text. We will discuss the efficacy of non-causal relationships between word and action in an effort to find more creative freedom. Participants will be asked to access instinct, impulse, irrational approaches and radical juxtapositions to expose the unnoticed meanings that may lie beneath the surface.

SCC 201D

 

The Second Act: The Trouble with Resolving it All with Heather Helinsky
In this workshop, we will tackle the challenging and common problems that arise when writing Act Two, especially in this day when we're all writing that 90-minute, intermission-less play for producers. We’ll look at some scene work examples and work through some short writing exercises together. If you’d like to share what you’re working on now, please contact HH before attending. Helinsky, a dramaturg who evaluates scripts for several national new play festivals (GPTC, O'Neill, Sundance, PlayPenn), will explore some various approaches a dramaturg uses in a development process when a writer is unsure of how to “fix their Act Two problem.”

Mule Barn 106

 

The Energized Space with Mary Beth Easley and Mark Bruckner
Everything is energy and that’s all there is to it. Match the Frequency of the reality you want and you cannot help but get that reality. It can be no other way. This is not philosophy. This is Physics.
- Albert Einstein
Theater is a living art form: it takes place in time (impacted by sound), moving (kinetically) through space (the visual field). This living art form generates energy, and that energy impacts both the generator and the receiver. The purpose of this workshop is to introduce the principles of individual and collective energy flow and investigate how these principles can be applied toward the creation of dramatic art. This is an immersive workshop where participants will also explore how music, soundscapes, and live Foley activate kinetic impulse and feed storytelling.

Mule Barn 112

3:45 – 5:30 p.m.

MainStage Reading

 
 

If Pretty Hurts Ugly Must be a Muhfucka by Tori Sampson
Exploring the annexation of beauty while employing a West African folklore alongside modern American culture, If Pretty Hurts Ugly Must Be a Muhfucka, follows four teenage girls as they recant how they’ve come to accept the definition of societal beauty standards and reasons people choose to risk everything for the opportunity to exist within its narrow definition. Located in this fictional town of Affreakah, Amirrorkah, Kaya, Massassi, Adama and Akim are given an opportunity to live in a society where their individual beauty can reign supreme, however it comes at dangerous price. This play doesn’t ask the question how much is beauty worth but rather, why are so many willing to pay its price?

Director: Denise Chapman
Actors:
Akim – Nadia Williams
Chours –Anthony Holmes
Ma – TammyRa Jackson
Dad – Dominique Morgan
Adama – Mecca Slaughter
Kaya –
Massassi – Brandi Smith
Kasim – Eric Lawson

Stage Directions – Rusheaa Smith-Turner
Responders: Constance Congdon, Kia Corthron, Jody McAuliffe
Dramaturg: Heather Helinsky

SCC 201A

7:30 p.m.

PlayFest
The Retreating WorldAn Evening Honoring the Work of Naomi Wallace
A performance of the middle section of Naomi Wallace's brilliant play The Fever Chart, and a conversation about her work, life and perspective on the role of theatre in expanding our capacity for compassion.

Director: Elena Araoz
And Featuring Ibrahim Miari
Panelists:  Elena Araoz, Constance Congdon, Kia Corthron, Kevin Lawler, Jody McAuliffe

Gallery 1516
1516 Leavenworth St.

SATURDAY, JUNE 4

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9:00 a.m.

Design Wing

Mule Barn Atrium

10:00 – 12:30 p.m.

MainStage Reading

 
 

Midlife by Ben Hoover
Becky daydreams. Becky gets fired. Becky worries that her barista got kidnapped. Becky is afraid an older woman is taking over her mind. Will Becky ever find solid ground? Experienced largely from Becky’s first-person perspective, Midlife situates the audience deep inside her brain. It asks the audience to consider where the mind goes when it wanders, what it means to have agency over your actions, and encourages wonder over what goes on in other people’s heads.

Director: Josh Hecht
Actors:
Becky - Kim Gambino
Ma – Andrea Lang
John – Hughston Walkinshaw
Her Boy Blue/Max – Dan Shaked
Michael Virgil Simon – John Gasper
W, G, Red, Lady, Mom – Andrea Hart
Oliver, M, C, Boss Swede – Kevin Barratt

Stage Directions – Danielle Smith
Responders: Constance Congdon, Kia Corthron, Jody McAuliffe
Dramaturg: Emma Goldman - Sherman

SCC 201A

12:30 p.m.

Lunch

Mule Barn Atrium

1:00 – 1:45 pm.

Luncheon Panel Series
GPTC Design Wing Presentations

Mule Barn Atrium

2:00 – 3:30 p.m

PlaySlam
A GPTC tradition of sharing short plays written during the conference.

Mule Barn Atrium

6:30 – 10:00 p.m.

7:30 p.m.

Closing Celebration
Festive evening for all GPTC guests, participants and volunteers. Dinner will be served.
Presentation of the 2016 Great Plains Playwright Awards.

Metropolitan Community College
Fort Omaha Campus
Swanson Conference Center
32nd and Sorensen Parkway

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