GPTC 2016 Workshops

Please look through our scheduled Workshops for this season and start getting your days planned out ahead of time!

SATURDAY, MAY 28

11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Theatre Workshop – Session One

The Unbearable Lightness of the Playwright/Director Relationship
Michael French

Mule Barn 101
How is equal space given to a relationship that’s built to collide because of its inherent differing agendas? The director wants artistic freedom; the playwright wants the sanctity of script. The director wants leeway to interpret; the playwright wants authorial intention maintained. This workshop looks at how to navigate the complexities of bringing a script to the stage from the director’s point of view, but with a playwright in mind. No attorneys needed!

Artistic Authenticity and Writing What You Do Not Know
Elena Araoz and Quinn Corbin

Mule Barn 102
Investigating controversial questions such as “Do you have to write what you know?” “Who are you allowed to write for?” and in a world of blind submissions, “Does it matter who wrote the play?” We’ll wrestle with matters of authenticity both in the art and the industry. Through writing exercises, we’ll articulate why we feel compelled to tell particular stories and explore ways to insert ourselves more fully into our work while maintaining the balance between overly personalized and too general. We’ll work to find our way into a new narrative through our own personal and unique lenses. Led by Quinn Corbin (a former theatrical agent and current script reader for multiple theatres and festivals) and Elena Araoz (a director and writer), this workshop will delve into the politicized debate of writing characters or stories different than who we are.

Using Setting to Explode the Stuck Scene
Josh Hecht

Mule Barn 105
What do you do when you have a scene that's just kinda...meh. It's functional, but it's flat. Something's stuck. Maybe it's just a little boring? How do you make the scene come alive? This workshop will use a series of exercises to help you use the scene's setting to unlock it's hidden life. Bring with you a scene you want to explode and something to write with and let's play.

Playwright’s Gym
Margaret Baldwin

Mule Barn 106
This workshop will jumpstart your process and help you reconnect with the PLAY in playwriting. Through brief exercises designed to help us—as playwrights—get out of our own way, we will explore the basic tools of drama (plot, character, words, music, and spectacle) and dive into some serious play. We will start with a gentle warm-up of our bodies and voices and will approach through the various languages of the stage. The workshop will offer a balance of group and individual exercises and will include simple stagings of generated work. Good for writers at any level of experience looking to recharge and reconnect with their own creative impulses. Come armed with a notebook or journal and your favorite non-electronic writing instrument. Dress in clothes that allow you to move.

The Jazz Acting Technique
Levy Lee Simon

Mule Barn 112
Experience Ernie McClintock’s Jazz Acting Technique, which concentrates on the actor approaching his or her work with the same freeness, openness, and improvisational mindset as a great jazz artist. It explores the body as an instrument and the emotions as notes - all while working in unity with an ensemble of like-minded actors (players).


SATURDAY, MAY 28

2:15 – 3:45 p.m.

Theatre Workshop – Session Two

Playmaking from found text
Constance Congdon

Mule Barn 101
Connie will bring in various examples of text and you will work in groups to make a scene out of the samples. Then we will read them in class and do as many as possible. Bring? Yourselves.

Writing in Tongues
Emma Goldman-Sherman

Mule Barn 102
Writers can be limited by what we allow ourselves to write. Permission needs granting. So how do we write what we do not know? How do we allow ourselves to discover strangers in our own work? This workshop addresses how white playwrights might inhabit characters of color in the worlds of their plays, and how all playwrights can enlarge the dictum "write what you know" to include "write what you want to know" and beyond… Playwrights of all kinds are welcome to join me in a workshop that will provide you with the tools you need -- like compassion, a grounding in what it means to have white privilege and how to find yours, curiosity to foster honest dialogue, and exercises to help your brain chart new territory, to give yourself permissions to try new approaches, and to inhabit new voices in your work!

The Left Handed Compliment
Eliza Bent

Mule Barn 105
Make use of your non-dominant hand -- or non-dominant language -- and discover the side door to your writing. By imposing physical and linguistic constraints we will essentialize ideas and dialogue and get to the heart of the matter. Unpretentious poems and organic movement might also happen.

Audition Fundamentals
Mia Morris

Mule Barn 106
This workshop is for actors who are interested in working on elements of the audition; one of the most challenging aspects to the craft of acting. Concentration, focus, connecting with a scene partner, and overall audition preparedness will be explored through exercises and text. Please dress comfortably, we will be moving.

The Energized Self
Mary Beth Easley

“Everything is energy and that’s all there is to it. Match the Frequency of the reality you want and you cannot help but get that reality. It can be no other way. This is not philosophy. This is Physics.” Albert Einstein

Mule Barn 112
Theater is a living art form: it takes place in time (impacted by sound), moving (kinetically) through space (the visual field). This living art form generates energy, and that energy impacts both the generator and the receiver. The purpose of this workshop is to introduce the principles of individual and collective energy flow and investigate how these principles can be applied toward the creation of dramatic art.


SUNDAY, MAY 29

11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Theatre Workshop – Session Three

Getting Unstuck
Kia Corthron

Mule Barn 101
Do you feel stuck on the play you’re currently working on? Or did you get stuck on a former piece and finally, in frustration, put it aside? This workshop will help get you out of creative gridlock, allowing you to open up your play via new, unexplored territory.

Strengthening Your Artistic Statements
Elena Araoz and Quinn Corbin

Mule Barn 102
Artistic Statements for theatre development opportunities, for any kind of theatre artist, can feel like a pitch and, in part, feel like a lie. We’ll explore ways to approach this often daunting task from a more playful and personal perspective. Through writing exercises, we’ll investigate what makes each of our artistries unique and each of our projects worth developing. We’ll discuss the industry standards for a great Artistic Statement and then we’ll discover how to break that mold to show off our authentic and unique voice. Led by Quinn Corbin (a former theatrical agent and current script reader for multiple theatres and festivals) and Elena Araoz (a director and writer), this workshop will delve into practical methods to approach each Artistic Statement with fresh eyes and ask for what we need from a development opportunity.

The Second Act: The Trouble with Resolving it All with
Heather Helinsky

Mule Barn 105
In this workshop, we will tackle the challenging and common problems that arise when writing Act Two, especially in this day when we're all writing that 90-minute, intermission-less play for producers. We’ll look at some scene work examples and work through some short writing exercises together. If you’d like to share what you’re working on now, please contact HH before attending. Helinsky, a dramaturg who evaluates scripts for several national new play festivals (GPTC, O'Neill, Sundance, PlayPenn), will explore some various approaches a dramaturg uses in a development process when a writer is unsure of how to “fix their Act Two problem.”

Taking Charge of Your Rewrite
Josh Hecht

Mule Barn 106
As writers, you will receive approximately 7,000 notes on your play between first draft and opening night. So, how do you take charge of your own rewrite? Before you start rewriting based on notes you get from someone else, how do you assess your own draft, identify strengths and weaknesses and set your own goals? This workshop is designed to help you do just that: diagnose your own draft yourself and start the rewrite you want to do before you start listening to the thoughts of others. A variety of exercises will help you to think structurally about how your play works while also continuing to tap into the unconscious impulses that are its lifeblood.

Unsettling Incident
Jody McAuliffe

Mule Barn 112
Think of an unsettling incident that happened to you. It can be funny, weird, scary, sad, or a combination – but whatever it is, it should be something that stayed in your mind, nagging at you: something you did at a party, an odd encounter on a bus, a mysterious phone-call, an accident you saw on the street, anything – as long as it affected you. Write a scene leading up to a MONOLOGUE, in which a character who has had an experience similar to yours TELLS this story to someone. Use what happened to you as the ‘plot’ for this story, but find a substitute for yourself, as the character who will speak the monologue.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1

11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Theatre Workshop – Session Four

Playmaking from found text
Constance Congdon

Mule Barn 101
Connie will bring in various examples of text and you will work in groups to make a scene out of the samples. Then we will read them in class and do as many as possible. Bring? Yourselves.

Getting Unstuck
Kia Corthron

Mule Barn 102
Do you feel stuck on the play you’re currently working on? Or did you get stuck on a former piece and finally, in frustration, put it aside? This workshop will help get you out of creative gridlock, allowing you to open up your play via new, unexplored territory.

Unsettling Incident
Jody McAuliffe

Mule Barn 105
Think of an unsettling incident that happened to you. It can be funny, weird, scary, sad, or a combination – but whatever it is, it should be something that stayed in your mind, nagging at you: something you did at a party, an odd encounter on a bus, a mysterious phone-call, an accident you saw on the street, anything – as long as it affected you. Write a scene leading up to a MONOLOGUE, in which a character who has had an experience similar to yours TELLS this story to someone. Use what happened to you as the ‘plot’ for this story, but find a substitute for yourself, as the character who will speak the monologue.

Playwright’s Gym
Margaret Baldwin

Mule Barn 106
This workshop will jumpstart your process and help you reconnect with the PLAY in playwriting. Through brief exercises designed to help us—as playwrights—get out of our own way, we will explore the basic tools of drama (plot, character, words, music, and spectacle) and dive into some serious play. We will start with a gentle warm-up of our bodies and voices and will approach through the various languages of the stage. The workshop will offer a balance of group and individual exercises and will include simple stagings of generated work. Good for writers at any level of experience looking to recharge and reconnect with their own creative impulses. Come armed with a notebook or journal and your favorite non-electronic writing instrument. Dress in clothes that allow you to move.

Move
David Neumann

SCC 201 A
This workshop will be about noticing and changing the patterns of a body that spends most of its time in a seated position. A movement class to find more breath, ease tension and stretch a little bit. Shake off the hangover. Stand a little taller. Move more freely. No dance/movement experience necessary. Wear loose, comfortable clothing.


FRIDAY, JUNE 3

2:00 – 3:30 p.m.

Theatre Workshop – Session Five

The Art of Self Production
Eliza Bent

Mule Barn 101
Don't know where to start when it comes to producing your own work? Let's get to work. In this workshop with Bent discover how producing can be as artful and satisfying as writing plays. The craft of the polite-yet-persistent follow up will be explored along with how to write a stellar press release and how to engage in brain tempests, a brain storm that is so big that it inspires you to reach a bigger goal than you could have imagined.

The Unbearable Lightness of the Playwright, Director Relationship
Michael French

Mule Barn 102
How is equal space given to a relationship that’s built to collide because of its inherent differing agendas? The director wants artistic freedom; the playwright wants the sanctity of script. The director wants leeway to interpret; the playwright wants authorial intention maintained. This workshop looks at how to navigate the complexities of bringing a script to the stage from the director’s point of view, but with a playwright in mind. No attorneys needed!

Language and Action in Conversation
David Neumann

SCC 201 D
This workshop will use formal approaches to generating physical events and actions as a compositional tool and then place the discoveries made in relation to found and original text. We will discuss the efficacy of non-causal relationships between word and action in an effort to find more creative freedom. Participants will be asked to access instinct, impulse, irrational approaches and radical juxtapositions to expose the unnoticed meanings that may lie beneath the surface.

The Second Act: The Trouble with Resolving it All
Heather Helinsky

Mule Barn 106
In this workshop, we will tackle the challenging and common problems that arise when writing Act Two, especially in this day when we're all writing that 90-minute, intermission-less play for producers. We’ll look at some scene work examples and work through some short writing exercises together. If you’d like to share what you’re working on now, please contact HH before attending. Helinsky, a dramaturg who evaluates scripts for several national new play festivals (GPTC, O'Neill, Sundance, PlayPenn), will explore some various approaches a dramaturg uses in a development process when a writer is unsure of how to “fix their Act Two problem.”

The Energized Space
Mary Beth Easley and Mark Bruckner

“Everything is energy and that’s all there is to it. Match the Frequency of the reality you want and you cannot help but get that reality. It can be no other way. This is not philosophy. This is Physics.”
Albert Einstein

Mule Barn 112
Theater is a living art form: it takes place in time (impacted by sound), moving (kinetically) through space (the visual field). This living art form generates energy, and that energy impacts both the generator and the receiver. The purpose of this workshop is to introduce the principles of individual and collective energy flow and investigate how these principles can be applied toward the creation of dramatic art. This is an immersive workshop where participants will also explore how music, soundscapes, and live Foley activate kinetic impulse and feed storytelling.

 
GPTC 2015 Play Lab
GPTC 2015 Play Lab
GPTC 2015 Play Lab